Archive for the 'ADAMAH' Category

Job Opportunity at ADAMAH

Adamah

We are seeking a full-time Program Coordinator to manage the day-to-day scheduling of the Adamah Fellowship and other Adamah programs, to teach classes and lead morning prayer services, and provide general program support. Ideal start date is May 15, 2010. Staff housing is available if needed.

Download a complete job description here. To apply, please send cover letter and resume to Heidi Jacquier. Please include in your cover letter a description of why you are uniquely suited to this position.

Who Will Eat the Goat?

Thanks so much to Lailah Robertson for this great guest post about her experience and the Hazon Food Conference. Lailah is a San Francisco freelance writer who writes the blog In My Box about her CSA box and all the delicious vegetarian, gluten-free things she makes with it. This post is NOT intended to endorse any particular diet or agenda, e.g. to say that being vegan (abstaining from all animal products) is the only way to live, or that vegetarians are hypocrites. It merely hopes to be an exploration of one of the least considered aspects of our food chain.

Nigel Savage, founder of Hazon, asked us two questions during his keynote speech last night at the Hazon Food Conference. It felt like the beginning of one of those Jewish parables, the ones where the wise rabbi asks or tells us something that means more than it seems on the surface, where you ponder on the teaching and the world opens up in a new way.

“Stand up if you eat meat, but you wouldn’t if you had to kill it yourself,” Nigel called out. A number of people in the packed hall rose from their seats. I applauded them for their self-awareness and honesty, while of course maintaining a certain degree of vegetarian smugness.

Then he asked us another question. “Stand up if you are vegetarian, but would eat meat if you killed it yourself.” This time fewer people stood up, but it was still a significant number.

Then Nigel told us the story of the goat.

Adamah Field Manager and Apprentice Positions Available

Harvest
Adamahniks helping with the sweet potato harvest at Chubby Bunny Farm in Falls Village, CT. Photo by Julia Gazdag.

As we put the fields to bed here at Adamah, we’re looking ahead to next season. We have several staff positions we are seeking to fill. If you’re looking for farm work that feeds the soil and the soul, Adamah is the place for you!

Field Manager: This is an ideal position for someone with 1-2 years farm experience looking for a manager position in an educational environment. The Field Manager will manage vegetable production on the 5-acre Adamah farm, which grows for a 50-share CSA, for the dining hall at the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center in Falls Village, CT, and for our value-added products business (pickles, sauerkraut and jam). For complete job description and info on how to apply contact Anna Hanau at anna@isabellafreedman.org.

Yid.Dish: Aviva Allen’s Spicy Potato Latkes


Organic Kosher Cookbook

If you are looking for a Chanukah gift for a foodie (say… yourself!), or some new recipes for any of the Jewish holidays, then there’s a new book out that will be of help. Aviva Allen, author of the 2007 The Organic Kosher Cookbook, has just released a Holiday Edition. Ms. Allen provided me with a free copy for this interview and review.

2009 Hazon Food Conference chair Emily Jane Freed named one of America’s ’40 farmers under 40′

Emily Jane Freed

The Mother Nature Network has released a list of the top farmers in the country under the age of 40, and Hazon’s Emily Jane Freed is recognized for her work, passion and commitment to sustainable farming practices and community outreach. Emily, who is the Assistant Production Manager for Jacobs Farms in Pescadero (northern California), comes in at #13 on the list, which, according to MNN, is compiled “with help from dozens of people in the farming industry — from farmers themselves to those who help them in the nonprofit sector to those in the media who cover them.”

Prayer for No Rain?

While most of us in the Northeast who are plugged in to local agriculture are reveling in our early CSA bounty, many of the producers of this bounty are worrying about the future of this year’s crop.

Laura, a friend in Cambridge, MA, who is a participant in this summer’s Adamah Fellowship in Falls Village, CT, writes on her blog that the Adamah CSA, which delivered its first share this week, is in danger of losing its crop due to the high volume of rain received by the Northeast US in the past few weeks. This amount of rain, combined with the fact that the rain is predicted to continue for several more days at least, and the fact that the farm is located next to a river, mean that it could cost them the viability of many crops, especially so early in the season.

Flooding Fields: An Argument Against Eating Locally?

Flowering zuchini amidst flodded paths in the sadeh

Flowering zucchini amidst flooded paths

It’s been cold and rainy at Adamah for quite some time now, and on Thursday we started getting worried about the river. I went down to look at the field around 2 — it was high, higher than I’d ever seen, but still about 2 feet below the banks. Dark, brown, quickly moving water, surging down the channel. Mesmerizing to look at. Difficult to believe that this flowing source of life could turn so destructive. But maybe…it wouldn’t rise any higher?

By evening, though, the water had risen to within 6″ of the banks. Where we usually scramble down four or five feet or so to hop in the river, you could practically step right in. So we assembled a crew, and moved the irrigation pump (which perches on the edge of the river) and the row cover from the fields, because if the field flooded the fabric would clothesline all the plants in its path, and collected stray buckets and plastic chairs that could float away if the river spilled over its banks and across the field.

Looking for Fresh Local Veggies in White Plains?

adamahandthetruck

Tuv Ha’Aretz in White Plains has a few shares still available – get yours in time for the first pick-up. This pick-up will include the sale of pickle products, goat cheese and yogurt from Adamah and cheeses from Five Spoke Creamery. They’re even providing wine!

The first pick-up begins THIS WEEK! Wed, June 17 at Temple Israel Center (in the auditorium) from 4 to 8 p.m.

Rosh Hodesh Iyyar in the Calendar Garden

Thanks to Rachel Kriger for this guest post, one of a regular monthly series. Rachel was raised on organic food and in Jewish day school. At Wesleyan University, she studied religion and sociology, and then found the most practical career to combine the two as an organic farming apprentice.  In the ADAMAH fellowship, she was able to merge her love of small scale farming and Judaism, and she became the farm manager for the following year. Currently, she in her clinical year as a Five Element Acupuncturist at the Tai Sophia Institute in Maryland. In the Calendar Garden at the Pearlstone Center, she is making more connections between plants, seasons, Jewish wisdom and body awareness.

Every time we pour a cup of wine for kiddush, we allow it to overflow symbolizing our overflowing joy.

We can also fill our body/mind/spirit vessel and overflow it.

This month, Iyar, is all about healing and asking to be filled with the divine love and light that is all around us, to connect with the divine love and light that is already within us, and to expand and overflow it to all we come into contact with. We are counting the days and becoming more pure as we head towards Shavuot.
Iyar is a month of introspection: listening deeply inside yourself and asking for healing and guidance.
Remember that you already are what you are striving to become. 
Let it grow slowly just like the plants do as they reach for the sun.
Let this slow spring be your teacher.

A Sunrise Over D.C.

Sunrise on a rare holiday

When Birkat HaChammah arrived a week ago, a group of people from the Washington area marked the morning in a very D.C. way—by converging on the National Mall. The spot the organizers chose—at the Lincoln Memorial, in sight of the Washington Monument and the reflecting pool—is a place folks from this city and around the nation have gathered for thousands of events spanning our parents’, grandparents, and great-great-grandparents’ lives. The historic spot seemed fitting for a holiday that comes once every 28 years, or once a generation. (And the Washington Post seemed to like the choice of venue and celebration enough to write and video about it).

Spring into Farming

Hi friends! Wanted to remind you all about the ADAMAH BLOG. Adamah is a a three-month leadership training program for Jewish young adults in their 20s that integrates organic farming, sustainable living, Jewish learning, community building and contemplative spiritual practice. Bookmark our blog to keep up with the goings on of a small, Jewish, organic farm. Share our pain as the cabbage in the greenhouse gets eaten, and our joy as steam from boiling maple sap turns into sweet sweet syrup once again. And join us, as we spring into farming….

Photo by ElatChayyim

Spring on the farm means we’re itching to get into the soil: spread compost and nutrients, till in the cover crop, create a level, weed-free seed bed for early transplants. As we get into April, though, I’m remembering one of the things I love about farming and find most challenging: you’re in control and you’re absolutely out of control at the same time. I’m caught between my spreadsheets–which outline the schedule I am to follow if we are to deliver 60 shares of vegetables to the CSA, and cucumbers and cabbage galore for the Picklarium–and the weather, which is neither predictable nor obliging….

Nevertheless, we proceed as best we can.

Head Over Heals for the Sun

bus1

Back when I was a wee tot enjoying my first veggies, birkat hachammah, the holiday honoring the creation of the sun—literally “the blessing of the sun”—quietly came and went.

On April 8, 28 years later, birkat hachammah will return. This time, I’m hearing all sorts of fanfare from a Jewish community more aware than ever of what the sun provides, and seizing the opportunity to encourage sustainable practices. As shared on this very blog, organizations are mobilizing.

Perhaps the most quirky and inspiring sign of this foment is the Topsy-Turvy bus from the Teva Learning Center.

This head-over-heals double school bus has been scooting between synagogues and schools on used vegetable oil since late February. Its mission? To teach kids about the blessing of the sun, and using our solar gifts wisely.

Approaching Purim in The Calendar Garden

Thanks to Rachel Kriger for this guest post, one of a regular monthly series.

Rachel was raised on organic food and in Jewish day school. At Wesleyan University, she studied religion and sociology, and then found the most practical career to combine the two as an organic farming apprentice. In the Adamah fellowship, she was able to merge her love of small scale farming and Judaism, and she became the farm manager for the following year. Currently, she in her clinical year as a Five Element Acupuncturist at the Tai Sophia Institute in Maryland. In the Calendar Garden at the Pearlstone Center, she is making more connections between plants, seasons, Jewish wisdom and body awareness.

On the 14th of Adar, tonight and Tuesday, we will celebrate Purim. It is said that when the Messiah comes, Purim will be the only remaining holiday. This is a miraculous holiday in which a Persian Queen, Esther, courageously revealed her Jewish identity to King Achashverosh in order to save the Jews from the decree of death orchestrated by the king’s wicked advisor, Haman. On this holiday we wear costumes and read the story. Whenever the name of Haman is said, we shake our noisemakers and boo loudly to blot out his name.

An Online Taste of Adamah

eva-with-violin

Here at Jcarrot there’s been plenty of talk of Adamah, whether about its pickles, its delivery truck that runs on used vegetable grease, or its role in the food conference.  

Now Adamah staff members, as well as summer and fall fellows, are keeping  a blog of their own to update about the Adamah experience.  Right now it’s especially interesting to learn how Northeast farmers spend their winter months. Watching their progress from now until the planting and growing season should be especially fascinating.   You may see some familiar faces from the Food Conference and recognize at least a few writers from Jcarrot.