Sustainable Simcha Centerpieces

Centerpieces are central to the design scheme of any simcha or celebration, but they can also be a great opportunity to send a message to the guests at your event. In this article, we offer some great ideas for sustainable, or “green” centerpieces and some quotations that can be placed in the centerpiece to explain to your guests why you have chosen to use them. Not only can your centerpiece be environmentally-friendly, but it can also be beautiful and allow you to show your creativity. Hopefully your use of these sustainable centerpieces can inspire your guests to find little ways to be more sustainable, too!

Centerpiece of vegetables

“For 3,000 years Jewish people have had a powerful connection to the land combined with a determination to create a better world for all. That’s why these are vegetables in this centerpiece – natural creations no less wonderful than flowers or plants. After our celebration, we’re giving them to XXX [local food pantry], [and we're making a donation to Hazon, to support the development of sustainable food systems for all.]”

Centerpiece of mini bonsai trees

“The Torah is described as “a tree of life.” In that spirit we hope you’ll enjoy this small tree in the center of our table! It really is a tree of life. For us it symbolizes a commitment to new growth and to the natural world that sustains us. In honor of our celebration, we’re choosing to support…..”

Centerpiece of the seven species

The Torah recounts 7 species of fruits and grains that are indigenous to the land of Israel – species that still grow in Israel to this day. It’s a reminder that our connection to the natural world that sustains us is enduring, and that’s why we’ve chosen to put these beautiful fruits and grains in the center of our table today. And because we know that there are those who are in need, even as we celebrate, we’ve chosen to support….”

Centerpiece of Local Organic Produce

“Judaism is a religion that is rooted in agriculture. Our holidays mark the agricultural cycle and we celebrate agriculture in many sacred texts. This connection to the land paired with our resolve as Jews to make the world a better place is why we’ve chosen to support local, organic agriculture by putting vegetables in this centerpiece – natural creations no less wonderful than flowers or plants. They’re local and organic and they’re from XXX Farm. As heirs to a tradition that asks whether something is fit (ie kosher) to eat, we want to widen that question in our generation. After our celebration, we’re giving them to XXX [local food pantry], [and we're making a donation to Hazon, to support the development of sustainable food systems for all.]”

Centerpiece of local cut flowers

“For 3,000 years Jewish people have had a powerful connection to the land, combined with a determination to create a better world for all. That’s why we’ve chosen to have local cut flowers in this centerpiece from XXX flower shop. Not only do these flowers remind us of our connection to the natural world that sustains us, but by buying local and organic we hope to continue the Jewish practice of Tikkun Olam, or “repairing the world”. And because we know that there are those who are in need, even as we celebrate, we’ve chosen to support….”

Centerpiece of plants

“As Jews, we are constantly reminded of our connection to the land and the other beings that inhabit it, a connection that dates back to Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. That’s why we’ve chosen to use potted plants for our centerpiece that our guests are welcome to take home with them after our celebration. These plants remind us of our connection to the natural world that sustains us. And because we know that there are those who are in need, even as we celebrate, we’ve chosen to support….”

Centerpiece of recycled items
(old wine bottles, mason jars, aluminum cans etc. filled with marbles, flowers, or fruit)

“The Jewish principle of Tikkun Olam, or “repairing the world” teaches us that as Jews we are not only responsible for the welfare of ourselves, but also for the welfare of all human beings. Recycling saves energy, reduces pollution, and can help to preserve our natural resources, making the world a better place to live in for all human beings. That is why we have chosen to use these recycled items in our centerpiece. And to further this initiative of bettering the world, even as we celebrate, we’ve chosen to support…”

Centerpiece of cut branches

“As Jews, we are taught that it is our duty to leave the world in a better state than we found it. The notion of Tikkun Olam, or “repairing the world” is a central Jewish teaching. For 3,000 years Jewish people have had a powerful connection to the land, combined with a determination to create a better world for all. That is why we have chosen to recycle these cut branches and use them as for our centerpiece. And to further this initiative of bettering the world, even as we celebrate, we’ve chosen to support…”

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